EXHIBITIONS

ON-THE-GO

Stay tuned for updates!

WHAT WE’RE KNOWN FOR

( currently closed for renovations)

  • DIORAMA EXPERIENCE
  • FERNANDO ZOBEL
  • GOLD OF ANCESTORS
  • CERAMICS
  • TEXTILES
DIORAMA EXPERIENCE

Diorama of Philippine History

Our Diorama Experience exhibition has been synonymous with the Ayala Museum for the past thirty-five years. The sixty dioramas are designed to be a comprehensive visual approach to Philippine history.

But more than that, they present the narrative of the story of the Philippine people in a way that compresses extensive research on the events, architecture, costumes, technologies and topographies of the times they represent. History is thus made more meaningful with the sense of immediacy the presentation provides; the sense of “being there as it happens”.

FERNANDO ZOBEL

Fernando Zobel

Ayala Museum reserves a section in its galleries to permanently feature the works of Fernando Zobel (1924-1984), the man behind its foundation.

The collection includes the artist’s paintings, sketches, prints and photographs put on display in regularly changing exhibitions. The gallery also houses a representation of his art studio in Cuenca, Spain, where he worked and resided in the latter part of his life. 

GOLD OF ANCESTORS

Gold of Ancestors

This exhibition of 1,059 gold objects dating to the tenth to thirteenth century celebrates the sophisticated cultures that flourished in the islands that came to be known as the Philippines after western colonization in the sixteenth to the twentieth century. 

While some of the objects found in this collection are likewise represented in other collections, many objects in this exhibit are unique and have never been seen in public.

CERAMICS

A Millennium of Contact

A Millennium of Contact: Chinese and Southeast Asian Trade Ceramics in the Philippines includes almost six hundred Chinese and Southeast Asian ceramics on long-term loan from the Roberto T. Villanueva Foundation. It is one of the most comprehensive collections of Chinese and Southeast Asian tradeware found in the Philippines.

Displayed are close to 500 ceramic objects dating from 9th-19th century featuring a wide variety of ware — from classic monochrome or single-colored ware to the very popular blue-and-white ware, recovered from across the archipelago.

TEXTILES

Art and the Order of Nature

Art and the Order of Nature in Indigenous Philippine Textiles consists of 111 textiles from the donation of Mercedes Zobel, representing indigenous communities in the Philippines from the Cordilleras in northern Philippines and from Mindanao in the south, including the Muslim regions in Western Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago.

In collaboration with the Prince’s School of Traditional Arts in London, the exhibition provides a new way seeing indigenous Philippine textiles. Using traditional geometry and biomorphic design principles, the artists of the Prince’s School analyzed a selection from the Mercedes Zobel Collection. Showcased alongside the actual objects in the exhibition, the analyses illustrate how Philippine indigenous textiles, like other great traditions, reflect the universal order of nature.